FAQs

Why can’t I find what I’m searching for in the Global DRO?

There are a number of possible reasons you may not be able to find the item you’re searching for in the Global DRO.

  • Supplements and vitamins are not included in the Global DRO. These products are subject to less stringent manufacturing and labeling regulations than pharmaceuticals, so it is virtually impossible to provide a definitive answer about whether or not they contain prohibited substances, despite what is listed on the packaging. Do not use the Global DRO to check individual ingredients in a supplement to determine if it is safe to use. Ingredients included in the Global DRO are tied to pharmaceutical products and have been through a regulatory process that is not applicable to supplements.
  • Make sure you’re looking for information from the correct country. Drugs and ingredients may be referred to by different names, or synonyms, in different countries. Be sure you select the correct nation of purchase before starting your search.
  • Drugs obtained outside of the UK, Canada, or the USA are not included in the Global DRO. You may verify the status of drugs purchased elsewhere by searching for the individual active ingredients, but you must exercise caution with the result.
  • The medication may be very new on the market, and yet to go through the Global DRO data review process.

 

The number of results returned for the search is overwhelming. How can I narrow it down?

Try any of the following:

  • Refine the search by typing more letters in the search parameter. 
  • Search by the DIN (Drug Identification Number).
  • Filter the search by BRANDS or Ingredients only.

 

What is a DIN?

A DIN is a unique eight-digit Drug Identification Number assigned by Health Canada to a drug product prior to being marketed in Canada. Every prescription and over-the-counter medication sold in Canada carries a DIN on its label. When you search the status of your product, check that the DIN on the label matches the DIN on the search result to be absolutely sure of the status of your product.

 

What should I do if my doctor has prescribed a medication that the Global DRO says is prohibited?

In the event that a prescribed medication is on The Prohibited List, you may need to apply for Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE). Consult the CCES website (www.cces.ca/tue) to learn the TUE rules and requirements that apply to you.


Why aren’t supplements and vitamins included in the Global DRO?

These products are subject to less stringent manufacturing and labeling regulations than pharmaceuticals, so it is virtually impossible to provide a definitive answer about whether or not they contain prohibited substances. Do not use the Global DRO to check individual ingredients in a supplement to determine if it is safe to use. Ingredients referenced in the Global DRO are related to pharmaceutical products and have been through a regulatory process that is not applicable to supplements.

 

What is the WADA Prohibited List and how is it determined what is included in the List?

The World Anti-Doping Agency, or WADA, maintains and updates this internationally-recognized list that identifies substances and methods that are prohibited in-competition, out-of-competition, and any variances for particular sports. The updated List is published by October 1 and it comes into effect on January 1 the following year.

WADA takes several factors into account when deciding whether to include a substance or method on the Prohibited List. A substance or method must meet two of the three following criteria to be included on the Prohibited List:

  1. Use of the substance or method has the potential to enhance sport performance;
  2. Use of the substance or method represents an actual or potential health risk to the athlete; and/or
  3. Use of the substance or method violates the “spirit of sport.”


A substance or method can also be included on the List if there is evidence that it has the potential to mask, or conceal, the use of other prohibited substances and methods.

 

What do the WADA Classifications refer to?

WADA divides the substances and methods included in the Prohibited List into classes based on similarities in chemical structure and benefits, or purpose, and are identified as a substance or method with either a “S” or “M.” Examples include S1. ANABOLIC AGENTS, such as anabolic steroids, or M1. ENHANCEMENT OF OXYGEN TRANSFER, such as blood doping. The List also includes a “P” classification for SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED IN PARTICULAR SPORTS.

 

Why can a drug be not prohibited out-of-competition, but prohibited in-competition?

Some drugs have no long-term performance-enhancing effects when used out-of-competition, or during training, but can be advantageous when used in-competition. Other drugs provide a performance-enhancing effect in training and during competition, so they are prohibited at all times.

 

Why does a drug’s route of administration matter? What difference does it make?

How a drug is administered, or its route of administration, affects how much of it is available to the body, and thus, the benefits of use. Typically, drugs administered by a systemic route (e.g., oral, intravenous injection) are very potent and effective, whereas a topical application (e.g., eye drops, skin cream) have a localized target and are not likely to impact anywhere other than the region applied. Other routes of administration fall between these categories.

 

The results from my search said that my medication is permitted by intravenous injection, but there was a note saying that it is prohibited by intravenous infusion. What’s the difference?

"By definition, an IV infusion is the supply of fluids or other liquid substrates via the insertion of a specialized needle into a vein and infusing fluids at a predetermined rate from a reservoir usually situated above the level of the body. An intravenous injection is the supply of fluid or medication by means of a syringe with a standard or butterfly needle, directly into a vein.“
(from WADA document https://wada-main-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/files/WADA_Medical_info_IV_infusions_3.0_EN.pdf.)

Intravenous (IV) infusions are included on the WADA Prohibited List for several reasons:

  • Athletes may attempt to manipulate their haematocrit or haemoglobin levels.
  • Athletes may use IV infusions to administer prohibited substances.
  • Athletes may use IV infusion to facilitate the unsafe practice of rapid rehydration.